MediaEval Multimedia Evaluation Benchmark: Tenth Anniversary and Counting

MediaEval Multimedia Challenges

MediaEval is a benchmarking initiative that offers challenges in multimedia retrieval, analysis and exploration. The tasks offered by MediaEval concentrate specifically on the human and social aspects of multimedia. They encourage researchers to bring together multiple modalities (visual, text, audio) and to think in terms of systems that serve users. Our larger aim is to promote reproducible research that makes multimedia a positive force for society. In order to provide an impression of the topical scope of MediaEval, we describe a few examples of typical tasks.

Historically, MediaEval tasks have often involved social media analysis. One of the first tasks offered by MediaEval, called the “Placing” Task, focused on the geo-location of social multimedia. This task ran from 2010-2016 and studied the challenge of automatically predicting the location at which an image has been taken. Over the years, the task investigated the benefits of combining text and image features, and also explored the challenges involved with geo-location prediction of video.

MediaEval “Placing” Task (2010-2016)

The “Placing” Task gave rise to two daughter tasks, which are focused on the societal impact of technology that can automatically predict the geo-location of multimedia shared online. One is Flood-related Multimedia, which challenges researchers to extract information related to flooding disasters from social media posts (combining text and images). The other is Pixel Privacy, which allows researchers to explore ways in which adversarial images can be used to protect sensitive information from being automatically extracted from images shared online.

The MediaEval Pixel Privacy Task (currently ongoing) had its own “trailer” in 2019

MediaEval has also offered a number of tasks that focus on how media content is received by users. The interest of MediaEval in the emotional impact of music is currently continued by the Emotion and Theme Recognition in Music Task. Also, the Predicting Media Memorability Task explores the aspects of video that are memorable to users.

The MediaEval Predicting Media Memorability Task (currently ongoing)

Recently, MediaEval has widened its focus to include multimedia analysis in systems. The Sports Video Annotation Task works towards improving sports training systems and the Medico Task focuses on multimedia analysis for more effective and efficient medical diagnosis.

Recent years have seen the rise of the use of sensor data in MediaEval. The No-audio Multimodal Speech Detection Task uses a unique data set captured by people wearing sensors and having conversations in a social setting. In addition to the sensor data, the movement of the speakers is captured by an overhead camera. The challenge is to detect the moments at which the people are speaking without making use of audio recordings.

Frames from overhead camera video of the
MediaEval No-audio Multimodal Speech Detection Task (currently ongoing)

The Insight for Wellbeing Task uses a data set of lifelog images, sensor data and tags captured by people walking through a city wearing sensors and using smartphones. The challenge is to relate the data that is captured to the local pollution conditions.

MediaEval 10th Anniversary Workshop

Each year, MediaEval holds a workshop that brings researchers together to share their findings, discuss, and plan next year’s tasks. The 2019 workshop marked the 10th anniversary of MediaEval, which became an independent benchmark in 2010. The MediaEval 2019 Workshop was hosted by EURECOM in Sophia Antipolis, France. The workshop took place 27-29 October 2020, right after ACM Multimedia 2019, in Nice, France.

group photo on stairs
MediaEval 2019 Workshop at EURECOM, Sophia, Antipolis, France (Photo credit: Mathias Lux)

The MediaEval 2019 Workshop is grateful to SIGMM for their support. This support contributed to helping ten students to attend the workshop, across a variety of tasks and also made it possible to record all of the workshop talks. We also gratefully acknowledge the Multimedia Computing Group at Delft University of Technology and EURECOM

Links to MediaEval 2019 tasks, videos and slides are available on the MediaEval 2019 homepage http://multimediaeval.org/mediaeval2019/. The link to the 2019 proceedings can be found there as well. 

presenter behind podium
Presenting results of a MediaEval task
(Photo credit: Vajira Thambawita)

MediaEval has compiled a bibliography of papers that have been published using MediaEval data sets. This list includes not only MediaEval workshop papers, but also papers published at other workshops, conferences, and in journals. In total, around 750 papers have been written that use MediaEval data, and this number continues to grow. Check out the bibliography at https://multimediaeval.github.io/bib.

The Medieval in MediaEval

A long-standing tradition in MediaEval is to incorporate some aspect of medieval history into the social event of the workshop. This tradition is a wordplay on our name (“mediaeval” is an older spelling of “medieval”). Through the years the medieval connection has served to provide a local context for the workshop and has strengthened the bond among participants. At the MediaEval 2019 Workshop, we offered the chance to take a nature walk to the medieval town of Biot.

people on path across river
A journey of discovery at the MediaEval 2019 workshop (Photo credit: Vajira Thambawita)

The walking participants and the participants taking the bus convened on the “Place des Arcades” in the medieval town of Biot, where we enjoyed a dinner together under historic arches.

The MediaEval 2019 workshop gathers in
Place des Arcades in Biot, near EURECOM
(Photo credit: Vajira Thambawita)

MediaEval 2020

MediaEval has just announced the task line-up for 2020. Registration will open in July 2020 and the runs will be due at the end of October 2020. The workshop will be held in December, with dates to be announced.

This year, the MediaEval workshop will be fully online. Since the MediaEval 2017 in Dublin, MediaEval has offered the possibility for remote workshop participation. Holding the workshop online this year is a natural extension of this trend, and we hope that researchers around the globe will take advantage of the opportunity to participate.

We are happy to introduce the new website: https://multimediaeval.github.io/. More information will be posted there as the season moves forward.

The day-to-day operations of MediaEval are handled by the MediaEval logistics committee, which grows stronger with each passing year. The authors of this article are logistics committee members from 2019. 

Standards Column: VQEG

Welcome to the first column on the ACM SIGMM Records from the Video Quality Experts Group (VQEG).
VQEG is an international and independent organisation of technical experts in perceptual video quality assessment from industry, academia, and government organisations.
This column briefly introduces the mission and main activities of VQEG, establishing a starting point of a series of columns that will provide regular updates of the advances within the current ongoing projects, as well as reports of the VQEG meetings. 
The editors of these columns are Jesús Gutiérrez (upper photo, jesus.gutierrez@upm.es), co-chair of the Immersive Media Group of VQEG and Kjell Brunnström (lower photo, kjell.brunnstrom@ri.se), general co-chair of VQEG.  Feel free to contact them for any further questions, comments or information, and also to check the VQEG website: www.vqeg.org.

Introduction

The Video Quality Experts Group (VQEG) was born from a need to bring together experts in subjective video quality assessment and objective quality measurement. The first VQEG meeting, held in Turin in 1997, was attended by a small group of experts drawn from ITU-T and ITU-R Study Groups. VQEG was first grounded in basic subjective methodology and objective tool development/verification for video quality assessment such that the industry could be moved forward with standardization and implementation. At the beginning it was focused around measuring the perceived video quality since the distribution path for video and audio were limited and known.

Over the last 20 years from the formation of VQEG the ecosystem has changed dramatically and thus so must the work. Multimedia is now pervasive on all devices and methods of distribution from broadcast to cellular data networks. This shift has the expertise within VQEG to move from the visual (no-audio) quality of video to Quality of Experience (QoE).

The march forward of technologies means that VQEG needs to react and be on the leading edge of developing, defining and deploying methods and tools that help address these new technologies and move the industry forward. This also means that we need to embrace both qualitative and quantitative ways of defining these new spaces and terms. Taking a holistic approach to QoE will enable VQEG to drive forward and faster with unprecedented collaboration and execution

VQEG is open to all interested from industry, academia, government organizations and Standard-Developing Organizations (SDOs). There are no fees involved, no membership applications and no invitations are needed to participate in VQEG activities. Subscription to the main VQEG email list (ituvidq@its.bldrdoc.gov) constitutes membership in VQEG.

VQEG conducts work via discussions over email reflectors, regularly scheduled conference calls and, in general, two face-to-face meetings per year. There are currently more than 500 people registered across 11 email reflectors, including a main reflector for general announcements relevant to the entire group, and different project reflectors dedicated to technical discussions of specific projects. A LinkedIn group exists as well.

Objectives

The main objectives of VQEG are: 

  • To provide a forum, via email lists and face-to-face meetings for video quality assessment experts to exchange information and work together on common goals. 
  • To formulate test plans that clearly and specifically define the procedures for performing subjective assessment tests and objective models validations.
  • To produce open source databases of multimedia material and test results, as well as software tools. 
  • To conduct subjective studies of multimedia and immersive technologies and provide a place for collaborative model development to take place.

Projects

Currently, several working groups are active within VQEG, classified under four main topics:

  1. Subjective Methods: Based on collaborative efforts to improve subjective video quality test methods.
    • Audiovisual HD (AVHD), project “Advanced Subjective Methods” (AVHD-SUB): This group investigates improved audiovisual subjective quality testing methods. This effort may lead to a revision of ITU-T Rec. P.911. As examples of its activities, the group has investigated alternative experiment designs for subjective tests, to validate subjective testing of long video sequences that are only viewed once by each subject. In addition, it conducted a joint investigation into the impact of the environment on mean opinion scores (MOS).
    • Psycho-Physiological Quality Assessment (PsyPhyQA): The aim of this project is to establish novel psychophysiology based techniques and methodologies for video quality assessment and real-time interaction of humans with advanced video communication environments. Specifically, some of the aspects that the project is looking at include: video quality assessment based on human psychophysiology (including, eye gaze, EEG, EKG, EMG, GSR, etc.), computational video quality models based on psychophysiological measurements, signal processing and machine learning techniques for psychophysiology based video quality assessment, experimental design and methodologies for psychophysiological assessment, correlates of psychophysics and psychophysiology. PsyPhyQA has published a dataset and testplan for a common framework for the evaluation of psychophysiological visual quality assessment.
    • Statistical Analysis Methods (SAM): This group addresses problems related to how to better analyze and improve data quality coming from subjective experiments and how to consider uncertainty in objective media quality predictors/models development. Its main goals are: to improve methods used to draw conclusions from subjective experiments, to understand the process of expressing opinion in a subjective experiment, to improve subjective experiment design to facilitate analysis and applications, to improve the analysis of objective model performances, and to revisit standardised methods for the assessment of the performance of objective model performances. 
  2. Objective Metrics: Working towards developing and validating objective video quality metrics.
    • Audiovisual HD (AVHD), project “AVHD-AS / P.NATS phase 2”: It is a joint project of VQEG and ITU Study Group 12 Question 14. The main goal is to develop a multitude of objective models, varying in terms of complexity/type of input/use-cases for the assessment of video quality in HTTP/TCIP based adaptive bitrate streaming services (e.g., YouTube, Vimeo, Amazon Video, Netflix, etc). For these services quality experienced by the end user is affected by video coding degradations, and delivery degradations due to initial buffering, re-buffering and media adaptations caused by the changes in bitrate, resolution, and frame rate
    • Computer Generated Imagery (CGI): focuses on the computer generated content for both images and videos material. The main goals are as follows: creating a large database of computer generated content, analyzing the content (feature extraction before and after rendering), analyzing the performance of objective quality metrics, evaluating/developing existing/new quality metrics/models for CGI material, studying rendering adaptation techniques (depending on the network constraints). This activity is in-line with the ITU-T work item P.BBQCG (Parametric Bitstream-based Quality Assessment of Cloud Gaming Services). 
    • No Reference Metrics (NORM): This group is an open collaborative for developing No-Reference metrics and methods for monitoring use case specific visual service quality. The NORM group is a complementary, industry-driven alternative of QoE to measure automatically the visual quality by using perceived indicators. Its main activities are to maintain a list of real-world use cases for visual quality monitoring, a list of potential algorithms and methods for no reference MOS and/or key indicators (visual artifact detection) for each use case, a list of methods (including datasets) to train and validate the algorithms for each use case, and a list of methods to provide root cause indication for each use case. In addition, the group encourages open discussions and knowledge sharing on all aspects related to no-reference metric research and development. 
    • Joint Effort Group (JEG) – Hybrid: This group is an open collaboration working together to develop a robust Hybrid Perceptual/Bit-Stream model. It has developed and made available routines to create and capture bit-stream data and parse bit-streams into HMIX files. Efforts are underway into developing subjectively rated video quality datasets with bit-stream data that can be used by all JEG researchers. The goal is to produce one model that combines metrics developed separately by a variety of researchers. 
    • Quality Assessment for Computer Vision Applications (QACoViA): the goal of this group is to study the visual quality requirements for computer vision methods, especially focusing on: testing methodologies and frameworks to identify the limit of computer vision methods with respect to the visual quality of the ingest; the minimum quality requirements and objective visual quality measure to estimate if a visual content is the operating region of computer vision; and delivering implementable algorithms being a proof/demonstrate of the new proposal concept of an objective video quality assessment methods for recognition tasks.
  3. Industry and Applications: Focused on seeking improved understanding of new video technologies and applications.
    • 5G Key Performance Indicators (5GKPI): Studies the relationship between the Key Performance Indicators (KPI) of new communication networks (namely 5G, but extensible to others) and the QoE of the video services on top of them. With this aim, this group addresses: the definition of relevant use cases (e.g., video for industrial applications, or mobility scenarios), the study of global QoE aspects for video in mobility and industrial scenarios, the identification of the relevant network KPIs(e.g., bitrate, latency, etc.) and application-level video KPIs (e.g., picture quality, A/V sync, etc.) and the generation of open datasets for algorithm testing and training.
    • IMG (Immersive Media Group): This group researches on quality assessment of immersive media, with the main goals of generating datasets of immersive media content, validating subjective test methods, and baseline quality assessment of immersive systems providing guidelines for QoE evaluation. The technologies covered by this group include: 360-degree content, virtual/augmented mixed reality, stereoscopic 3D content, Free Viewpoint Video, multiview technologies, light field content, etc.
  4. Support and Outreach: Responsible for the support for VQEG’s activities.
    • eLetter: The goal of VQEG eLetter is to provide up-to-date technical advances on video quality related topics. Each issue of VQEG eletter features a collection of papers authored by well-known researchers. These papers are contributed by invited authors or authors responding to a call-for-paper, and they can be: technical papers, summary/review of other publications, best practice anthologies, reprints of difficult to obtain articles, and responses to other articles. VQEG wants the eLetter to be interactive in nature.
    • Human Factors for Visual Experiences (HFVE): The objectives of this group is  to uphold the liaison relation between VQEG and the IEEE standardization group P3333.1. Some examples of the activities going on within this group are the standard for the (deep learning-based) assessment based on human factors of visual experiences with virtual/augmented/mixed reality and the standards on human factors for the  quality assessment of light field imaging (IEEE P3333.1.4) and on quality assessment of high dynamic range technologies. 
    • Independent Lab Group (ILG): The ILG act as independent arbitrators, whose generous contributions make possible the VQEG validation tests. Their goal is to ensure that all VQEG validation testing is unbiased and done to high quality standards. 
    • Joint Effort Group (JEG): is an activity within VQEG that promotes collaborative efforts addressed to: validate metrics through both subjective dataset completion and metric design, extend subjective datasets in order to better identify the limitations of quality metrics, improve subjective methodologies to address new scenarios and use cases that involve QoE issues, and increase the knowledge about both subjective and objective video quality assessment.
    • Joint Qualinet-VQEG team on Immersive Media: The objectives of this joint team from Qualinet and VQEG are: to uphold the liaison relation between both bodies, to inform both QUALINET and VQEG on the activities in respective organizations (especially on the topic of immersive media), to promote collaborations on other topics (i.e., form new joint teams), and to uphold the liaison relation with ITU-T SG12, in particular on topics around interactive, augmented and virtual reality QoE.
    • Tools and Subjective Labs Setup: The objective of this project is to provide the video quality research community with a wide variety of software tools and guidance in order to facilitate research. Tools are available in the following categories: quality analysis (software to run quality analyses), encoding (video encoding tools), streaming (streaming and extracting information from video streams), subjective test software (tools for running and analyzing subjective tests), and helper tools (miscellaneous helper tools).

In addition, the Intersector Rapporteur Group on Audiovisual Quality Assessment (IRG-AVQA) studies topics related to video and audiovisual quality assessment (both subjective and objective) among ITU-R Study Group 6 and ITU-T Study Group 12. VQEG colocates meetings with the IRG-AVQA to encourage a wider range of experts to contribute to Recommendations. 

For more details and previous closed projects please check: https://www.its.bldrdoc.gov/vqeg/projects-home.aspx

Major achievements

VQEG activities are documented in reports and submitted to relevant ITU Study Groups (e.g., ITU-T SG9, ITU-T SG12, ITU-R WP6C), and other SDOs as appropriate. Several VQEG studies have resulted in ITU Recommendations.

VQEG ProjectDescriptionITU Recommendations
Full Reference Television (FRTV) Phase I Examined the performance of FR and NR models on standard definition video. The test materials used in this test plan and the subjective tests data are freely available to researchers. ITU-T J.143 (2000), ITU-T J.144 (2001), ITU-T J.149 (2004)
Full Reference Television (FRTV) Phase II Examined the performance of FR and NR models on standard definition video, using the DSCQS methodology. ITU-T J.144 (2004)
ITU-R BT.1683 (2004)
Multimedia (MM) Phase I Examined the performance of FR, RR and NR models for VGA, CIF and QCIF video (no audio).ITU-T J.148 (2003)
ITU-T P.910 (2008)
ITU-T J.246 (2008)
ITU-T J.247 (2008)
ITU-T J.340 (2010)
ITU-R BT.1683 (2004)
Reduced Reference / No Reference Television (RRNR-TV) Examined the performance of RR and NR models on standard definition video ITU-T J.244 (2008)
ITU-T J.249 (2010)
ITU-R BT.1885 (2011)
High Definition Television (HDTV) Examined the performance of FR, RR and NR models for HDTV. Some of the video sequences used in this test are publicly available in the Consumer Digital Video Library.ITU-T J.341 (2011)
ITU-T J.342 (2011)
QARTStudied the subjective quality evaluation of video used for recognition tasks and task-based multimedia applications. ITU-T P.912 (2008)
Hybrid Perceptual BitstreamExamined the performance of Hybri models for VGA/WVGA and HDTV ITU-T J.343 (2014)
ITU-T J.343.1-6 (2014)
3DTVInvestigated how to assess 3DTV subjective video quality, covering methodologies, display requirements and evaluation of visual discomfort and fatigue. ITU-T P.914 (2016)
ITU-T P.915 (2016)
ITU-T P.916 (2016)
Audiovisual HD (AVHD)On one side, addressed the subjective evaluation of audio-video quality metrics.
On the other side, developed model standards for video quality assessment of streaming services over reliable transport for resolutions up to 4K/UHD, in collaboration with ITU-T SG12.
ITU-T P.913 (2014)
ITU-T P.1204 (2020)
ITU-T P.1204.3 (2020)
ITU-T P.1204.4 (2020)
ITU-T P.1204.5 (2020)

The contribution to current ITU standardization efforts is still ongoing. For example, updated texts have been contributed by VQEG on statistical analysis in ITU-T Rec. P.1401, and on subjective quality assessment of 360-degree video in ITU-T P.360-VR. 

Apart from this, VQEG is supporting the research on QoE by providing for the research community tools and datasets. For instance, it is worth noting the wide variety of software tools and guidance in order to facilitate research provided by VQEG Tools and Subjective Labs Setup via GitHub. Another example, is the VQEG Image Quality Evaluation Tool (VIQET), which is an objective no-reference photo quality evaluation tool. Finally, several datasets have been published which can be found in the websites of the corresponding projects, in the Consumer Digital Video Library or in other repositories.

General articles for the interested reader about the work of VQEG, especially covering the previous works are [1, 2].

References

[1] Q. Huynh-Thu, A. Webster, K. Brunnström, and M. Pinson, “VQEG: Shaping Standards on Video Quality”, in 1st International Conference on Advanced Imaging, Tokyo, Japan, 2015.
[2] K. Brunnström, D. Hands, F. Speranza, and A. Webster, “VQEG Validation and ITU Standardisation of Objective Perceptual Video Quality Metrics”, IEEE Signal Processing Magazine, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 96-101, May 2009.

JPEG Column: 87th JPEG Meeting

The 87th JPEG meeting initially planned to be held in Erlangen, Germany, was held online from 25-30, April 2020 because of the Covid-19 outbreak. JPEG experts participated in a number of online meetings attempting to make them as effective as possible while considering participation from different time zones, ranging from Australia to California, U.S.A.

JPEG decided to proceed with a Second Call for Evidence on JPEG Pleno Point Cloud Coding and continued work to prepare for contributions to the previous Call for Evidence on Learning-based Image Coding Technologies (JPEG AI).

The 87th JPEG meeting had the following highlights:

  • JPEG Pleno Point Cloud Coding issues a Call for Evidence on coding solutions supporting scalability and random access of decoded point clouds.
  • JPEG AI defines evaluation methodologies of the Call for Evidence on machine learning based image coding solutions.
  • JPEG XL defines the file format compatible with existing formats. 
  • JPEG exploration on Media Blockchain releases use cases and requirements.
  • JPEG Systems releases a first version of JPEG Snack use cases and requirements.
  • JPEG XS announces significant improvement of the quality of raw-Bayer image sensor data compression.

JPEG Pleno Point Cloud

JPEG Pleno is working towards the integration of various modalities of plenoptic content under a single and seamless framework. Efficient and powerful point cloud representation is a key feature within this vision. Point cloud data supports a wide range of applications including computer-aided manufacturing, entertainment, cultural heritage preservation, scientific research and advanced sensing and analysis. During the 87th JPEG meeting, the JPEG Committee released a Second Call for Evidence on JPEG Pleno Point Cloud Coding that focuses specifically on point cloud coding solutions supporting scalability and random access of decoded point clouds. The Second Call for Evidence on JPEG Pleno Point Cloud Coding has a revised timeline reflecting changes in the activity due to the 2020 COVID-19 Pandemic. A Final Call for Evidence on JPEG Pleno Point Cloud Coding is planned to be released in July 2020.

JPEG AI

The main focus of JPEG AI was on the promotion and definition of the submission and evaluation methodologies of the Call for Evidence (in coordination with the IEEE MMSP 2020 Challenge) that was issued as outcome of the 86th JPEG meeting, Sydney, Australia.

JPEG XL

The File Format has been defined for JPEG XL (ISO/IEC 18181-1) codestream, metadata and extensions. The file format enables compatibility with ISOBMFF, JUMBF, XMP, Exif and other existing standards. Standardization has now reached the Committee Draft stage and the DIS ballot is ongoing. A white paper about JPEG XL’s features and tools was approved at this meeting and is available on the jpeg.org website.

JPEG exploration on Media Blockchain – Call for feedback on use cases and requirements

JPEG has determined that blockchain and distributed ledger technologies (DLT) have great potential as a technology component to address many privacy and security related challenges in digital media applications. This includes digital rights management, privacy and security, integrity verification, and authenticity, that impacts society in several ways including the loss of income in the creative sector due to piracy, the spread of fake news, or evidence tampering for fraud purposes.

JPEG is exploring standardization needs related to media blockchain to ensure seamless interoperability and integration of blockchain technology with widely accepted media standards. In this context, the JPEG Committee announces a call for feedback from interested stakeholders on the first public release of the use cases and requirements document.

JPEG Systems initiates standardisation of JPEG Snack

Media “snacking”, the consumption of multimedia in short bursts (less than 15 minutes) has become globally popular. JPEG recognizes the need for standardizing how snack images are constructed to ensure interoperability. A first version of JPEG Snack use cases and requirements is now complete and publicly available on JPEG website inviting feedback from stakeholders.

JPEG made progress on a fundamental capability of the JPEG file structure with enhancements to JPEG Universal Metadata Box Format (JUMBF) to support embedding common file types; the DIS text for JUMBF Amendment 1 is ready for ballot. Likewise JPEG 360 Amendment 1 DIS text is ready for ballot; this amendment supports stereoscopic 360 degree images, accelerated rendering for regions-of-interest, and removes the XMP signature block from the metadata description.

JPEG XS – The JPEG committee is pleased to announce significant improvement of the quality of its upcoming Bayer compression.

Over the past year, an improvement of around 2dB has been observed for the new coding tools currently being developed for image sensor compression within JPEG XS. This visually lossless low-latency and lightweight compression scheme can be used as a mezzanine codec in various markets like real-time video storage inside and outside of cameras, and data compression onboard autonomous cars. Mathematically lossless capability is also investigated and encapsulation within MXF or SMPTE ST2110-22 is currently being finalized.

Final Quote

“JPEG is committed to the development of new standards that provide state of the art imaging solutions to the largest spectrum of stakeholders. During the 87th meeting, held online because of the Covid-19 pandemic, JPEG progressed well with its current and even launched new activities. Although some timelines had to be revisited, overall, no disruptions of the workplan have occurred.” said Prof. Touradj Ebrahimi, the Convenor of the JPEG Committee.

About JPEG

The Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) is a Working Group of ISO/IEC, the International Organisation for Standardization / International Electrotechnical Commission, (ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 29/WG 1) and of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU-T SG16), responsible for the popular JPEG, JPEG 2000, JPEG XR, JPSearch, JPEG XT and more recently, the JPEG XS, JPEG Systems, JPEG Pleno and JPEG XL families of imaging standards.

More information about JPEG and its work is available at jpeg.org or by contacting Antonio Pinheiro or Frederik Temmermans (pr@jpeg.org) of the JPEG Communication Subgroup.

If you would like to stay posted on JPEG activities, please subscribe to the jpeg-news mailing list on http://jpeg-news-list.jpeg.org.  

Future JPEG meetings are planned as follows:

  • No 88, initially planned in Geneva, Switzerland, July 4 to 10, 2020, will be held online from July 7 to 10, 2020.

MPEG Column: 130th MPEG Meeting (virtual/online)

The original blog post can be found at the Bitmovin Techblog and has been modified/updated here to focus on and highlight research aspects.

The 130th MPEG meeting concluded on April 24, 2020, in Alpbach, Austria … well, not exactly, unfortunately. The 130th MPEG meeting concluded on April 24, 2020, but not in Alpbach, Austria.

I attended the 130th MPEG meeting remotely.

Because of the Covid-19 pandemic, the 130th MPEG meeting has been converted from a physical meeting to a fully online meeting, the first in MPEG’s 30+ years of history. Approximately 600 experts attending from 19 time zones worked in tens of Zoom meeting sessions supported by an online calendar and by collaborative tools that involved MPEG experts in both online and offline sessions. For example, input contributions had to be registered and uploaded ahead of the meeting to allow for efficient scheduling of two-hour meeting slots, which have been distributed from early morning to late night in order to accommodate experts working in different time zones as mentioned earlier. These input contributions have been then mapped to GitLab issues for offline discussions and the actual meeting slots have been primarily used for organizing the meeting, resolving conflicts, and making decisions including approving output documents. Although the productivity of the online meeting could not reach the level of regular face-to-face meetings, the results posted in the press release show that MPEG experts managed the challenge quite well, specifically

  • MPEG ratifies MPEG-5 Essential Video Coding (EVC) standard;
  • MPEG issues the Final Draft International Standards for parts 1, 2, 4, and 5 of MPEG-G 2nd edition;
  • MPEG expands the coverage of ISO Base Media File Format (ISOBMFF) family of standards;
  • A new standard for large scale client-specific streaming with MPEG-DASH;

Other Important Activities at the 130th MPEG meeting(i) the carriage of visual volumetric video-based coding data, (ii) Network-Based Media Processing (NBMP) function templates, (iii) the conversion from MPEG-21 contracts to smart contracts, (iv) deep neural network-based video coding, (v) Low Complexity Enhancement Video Coding (LCEVC) reaching DIS stage, and (vi) a new level of the MPEG-4 Audio ALS Simple Profile for high-resolution audio among others

The corresponding press release of the 130th MPEG meeting can be found here: https://mpeg.chiariglione.org/meetings/130. This report focused on video coding (EVC) and systems aspects (file format, DASH).

MPEG ratifies MPEG-5 Essential Video Coding Standard

At its 130th meeting, MPEG announced the completion of the new ISO/IEC 23094-1 standard which is referred to as MPEG-5 Essential Video Coding (EVC) and has been promoted to Final Draft International Standard (FDIS) status. There is a constant demand for more efficient video coding technologies (e.g., due to the increased usage of video on the internet), but coding efficiency is not the only factor determining the industry’s choice of video coding technology for products and services. The EVC standard offers improved compression efficiency compared to existing video coding standards and is based on the statements of all contributors to the standard who have committed announcing their license terms for the MPEG-5 EVC standard no later than two years after the FDIS publication date.

The MPEG-5 EVC defines two important profiles, including “Baseline profile” and “Main profile”. The “Baseline Profile” contains only technologies that are older than 20 years or otherwise freely available for use in the standard. In addition, the “Main Profile” adds a small number of additional tools, each of which can be either cleanly disabled or switched to the corresponding baseline tool on an individual basis.

It will be interesting to see how EVC profiles (baseline and main) will find its path into products and services given the existing number of codecs already in use (e.g., AVC, HEVC, VP9, AV1) and those still under development but being close to ratification (e.g., VVC, LCEVC). That is, in total, we may end up with about seven video coding formats that probably need to be considered for future video products and services. In other words, the multi-codec scenario I have envisioned some time ago is becoming reality raising some interesting challenges to be addressed in the future.

Research aspects: as for all video coding standards, the most important research aspect is certainly coding efficiency. For EVC it might be also interesting to research its usability of the built-in tool switching mechanism within a practical setup. Furthermore, the multi-codec issue, the ratification of EVC adds another facet to the already existing video coding standards in use or/and under development.

MPEG expands the Coverage of ISO Base Media File Format (ISOBMFF) Family of Standards

At the 130th WG11 (MPEG) meeting, the ISOBMFF family of standards has been significantly amended with new tools and functionalities. The standards in question are as follows:

  • ISO/IEC 14496-12: ISO Base Media File Format;
  • ISO/IEC 14496-15: Carriage of network abstraction layer (NAL) unit structured video in the ISO base media file format;
  • ISO/IEC 23008-12: Image File Format; and
  • ISO /IEC 23001-16: Derived visual tracks in the ISO base media file format.

In particular, three new amendments to the ISOBMFF family have reached their final milestone, i.e., Final Draft Amendment (FDAM):

  1. Amendment 4 to ISO/IEC 14496-12 (ISO Base Media File Format) allows the use of a more compact version of metadata for movie fragments;
  2. Amendment 1 to ISO/IEC 14496-15 (Carriage of network abstraction layer (NAL) unit structured video in the ISO base media file format) adds support of HEVC slice segment data track and additional extractor types for HEVC such as track reference and track groups; and
  3. Amendment 2 to ISO/IEC 23008-12 (Image File Format) adds support for more advanced features related to the storage of short image sequences such as burst and bracketing shots.

At the same time, new amendments have reached their first milestone, i.e., Committee Draft Amendment (CDAM):

  1. Amendment 2 to ISO/IEC 14496-15 (Carriage of network abstraction layer (NAL) unit structured video in the ISO base media file format) extends its scope to newly developed video coding standards such as Essential Video Coding (EVC) and Versatile Video Coding (VVC); and
  2. the first edition of ISO/IEC 23001-16 (Derived visual tracks in the ISO base media file format) allows a new type of visual track whose content can be dynamically generated at the time of presentation by applying some operations to the content in other tracks, such as crossfading over two tracks.

Both are expected to reach their final milestone in mid-2021.

Finally, the final text for the ISO/IEC 14496-12 6th edition Final Draft International Standard (FDIS) is now ready for the ballot after converting MP4RA to the Maintenance Agency. WG11 (MPEG) notes that Apple Inc. has been appointed as the Maintenance Agency and MPEG appreciates its valuable efforts for the many years while already acting as the official registration authority for the ISOBMFF family of standards, i.e., MP4RA (https://mp4ra.org/). The 6th edition of ISO/IEC 14496-12 is expected to be published by ISO by the end of this year.

Research aspects: the ISOBMFF family of standards basically offers certain tools and functionalities to satisfy the given use case requirements. The task of the multimedia systems research community could be to scientifically validate these tools and functionalities with respect to the use cases and maybe even beyond, e.g., try to adopt these tools and functionalities for novel applications and services.

A New Standard for Large Scale Client-specific Streaming with DASH

Historically, in ISO/IEC 23009 (Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP; DASH), every client has used the same Media Presentation Description (MPD) as it best serves the scalability of the service (e.g., for efficient cache efficiency in content delivery networks). However, there have been increasing requests from the industry to enable customized manifests for more personalized services. Consequently, MPEG has studied a solution to this problem without sacrificing scalability, and it has reached the first milestone of its standardization at the 130th MPEG meeting.

ISO/IEC 23009-8 adds a mechanism to the Media Presentation Description (MPD) to refer to another document, called Session-based Description (SBD), which allows per-session information. The DASH client can use this information (i.e., variables and their values) provided in the SBD to derive the URLs for HTTP GET requests. This standard is expected to reach its final milestone in mid-2021.

Research aspects: SBD’s goal is to enable personalization while maintaining scalability which calls for a tradeoff, i.e., which kind of information to put into the MPD and what should be conveyed within the SBD. This tradeoff per se could be considered already a research question that will be hopefully addressed in the near future.

An overview of the current status of MPEG-DASH can be found in the figure below.

The next MPEG meeting will be from June 29th to July 3rd and will be again an online meeting. I am looking forward to a productive AhG period and an online meeting later this year. I am sure that MPEG will further improve its online meeting capabilities and can certainly become a role model for other groups within ISO/IEC and probably also beyond.

Definitions of Crowdsourced Network and QoE Measurements

1 Introduction and Definitions

Crowdsourcing is a well-established concept in the scientific community, used for instance by Jeff Howe and Mark Robinson in 2005 to describe how businesses were using the Internet to outsource work to the crowd [2], but can be dated back up to 1849 (weather prediction in the US). Crowdsourcing has enabled a huge number of new engineering rules and commercial applications. To better define crowdsourcing in the context of network measurements, a seminar was held in Würzburg, Germany 25-26 September 2019 on the topic “Crowdsourced Network and QoE Measurements”. It notably showed the need for releasing a white paper, with the goal of providing a scientific discussion of the terms “crowdsourced network measurements” and “crowdsourced QoE measurements”. It describes relevant use cases for such crowdsourced data and its underlying challenges.

The outcome of the seminar is the white paper [1], which is – to our knowledge – the first document covering the topic of crowdsourced network and QoE measurements. This document serves as a basis for differentiation and a consistent view from different perspectives on crowdsourced network measurements, with the goal of providing a commonly accepted definition in the community. The scope is focused on the context of mobile and fixed network operators, but also on measurements of different layers (network, application, user layer). In addition, the white paper shows the value of crowdsourcing for selected use cases, e.g., to improve QoE, or address regulatory issues. Finally, the major challenges and issues for researchers and practitioners are highlighted.

This article now summarizes the current state of the art in crowdsourcing research and lays down the foundation for the definition of crowdsourcing in the context of network and QoE measurements as provided in [1]. One important effort is first to properly define the various elements of crowdsourcing.

1.1 Crowdsourcing

The word crowdsourcing itself is a mix of the crowd and the traditional outsourcing work-commissioning model. Since the publication of [2], the research community has been struggling to find a definition of the term crowdsourcing [3,4,5] that fits the wide variety of its applications and new developments. For example, in ITU-T P.912, crowdsourcing has been defined as:

Crowdsourcing consists of obtaining the needed service by a large group of people, most probably an on-line community.

The above definition has been written with the main purpose of collecting subjective feedback from users. For the purpose of this white paper focused on network measurements, it is required to clarify this definition. In the following, the term crowdsourcing will be defined as follows:

Crowdsourcing is an action by an initiator who outsources tasks to a crowd of participants to achieve a certain goal.

The following terms are further defined to clarify the above definition:

A crowdsourcing action is part of a campaign that includes processes such as campaign design and methodology definition, data capturing and storage, and data analysis.

The initiator of a crowdsourcing action can be a company, an agency (e.g., a regulator), a research institute or an individual.

Crowdsourcing participants (also “workers” or “users”) work on the tasks set up by the initiator. They are third parties with respect to the initiator, and they must be human.

The goal of a crowdsourcing action is its main purpose from the initiator’s perspective.

The goals of a crowdsourcing action can be manifold and may include, for example:

  • Gathering subjective feedback from users about an application (e.g., ranks expressing the experience of users when using an application)
  • Leveraging existing capacities (e.g., storage, computing, etc.)  offered by companies or individual users to perform some tasks
  • Leveraging cognitive efforts of humans for problem-solving in a scientific context.

In general, an initiator adopts a crowdsourcing approach to remedy a lack of resources (e.g., running a large-scale computation by using the resources of a large number of users to overcome its own limitations) or to broaden a test basis much further than classical opinion polls. Crowdsourcing thus covers a wide range of actions with various degrees of involvement by the participants.

In crowdsourcing, there are various methods of identifying, selecting, receiving, and retributing users contributing to a crowdsourcing initiative and related services. Individuals or organizations obtain goods and/or services in many different ways from a large, relatively open and often rapidly-evolving group of crowdsourcing participants (also called users). The use of goods or information obtained by crowdsourcing to achieve a cumulative result can also depend on the type of task, the collected goods or information and final goal of the crowdsourcing task.

1.2 Roles and Actors

Given the above definitions, the actors involved in a crowdsourcing action are the initiator and the participants. The role of the initiator is to design and initiate the crowdsourcing action, distribute the required resources to the participants (e.g., a piece of software or the task instructions, assign tasks to the participants or start an open call to a larger group), and finally to collect, process and evaluate the results of the crowdsourcing action.

The role of participants depends on their degree of contribution or involvement. In general, their role is described as follows. At least, they offer their resources to the initiator, e.g., time, ideas, or computation resources. In higher levels of contributions, participants might run or perform the tasks assigned by the initiator, and (optionally) report the results to the initiator.

Finally, the relationships between the initiator and the participants are governed by policies specifying the contextual aspects of the crowdsourcing action such as security and confidentiality, and any interest or business aspects specifying how the participants are remunerated, rewarded or incentivized for their participation in the crowdsourcing action.

2 Crowdsourcing in the Context of Network Measurements

The above model considers crowdsourcing at large. In this section, we analyse crowdsourcing for network measurements, which creates crowd data. This exemplifies the broader definitions introduced above, even if the scope is more restricted but with strong contextual aspects like security and confidentiality rules.

2.1 Definition: Crowdsourced Network Measurements

Crowdsourcing enables a distributed and scalable approach to perform network measurements. It can reach a large number of end-users all over the world. This clearly surpasses the traditional measurement campaigns launched by network operators or regulatory agencies able to reach only a limited sample of users. Primarily, crowd data may be used for the purpose of evaluating QoS, that is, network performance measurements. Crowdsourcing may however also be relevant for evaluating QoE, as it may involve asking users for their experience – depending on the type of campaign.

With regard to the previous section and the special aspects of network measurements, crowdsourced network measurements/crowd data are defined as follows, based on the previous, general definition of crowdsourcing introduced above:

Crowdsourced network measurements are actions by an initiator who outsources tasks to a crowd of participants to achieve the goal of gathering network measurement-related data.

Crowd data is the data that is generated in the context of crowdsourced network measurement actions.

The format of the crowd data is specified by the initiator and depends on the type of crowdsourcing action. For instance, crowd data can be the results of large scale computation experiments, analytics, measurement data, etc. In addition, the semantic interpretation of crowd data is under the responsibility of the initiator. The participants cannot interpret the crowd data, which must be thoroughly processed by the initiator to reach the objective of the crowdsourcing action.

We consider in this paper the contribution of human participants only. Distributed measurement actions solely made by robots, IoT devices or automated probes are excluded. Additionally, we require that participants consent to contribute to the crowdsourcing action. This consent might, however, vary from actively fulfilling dedicated task instructions provided by the initiator to merely accepting terms of services that include the option of analysing usage artefacts generated while interacting with a service.

It follows that in the present document, it is assumed that measurements via crowdsourcing (namely, crowd data) are performed by human participants aware of the fact that they are participating in a crowdsourcing campaign. Once clearly stated, more details need to be provided about the slightly adapted roles of the actors and their relationships in a crowdsourcing initiative in the context of network measurements.

2.2 Active and Passive Measurements

For a better classification of crowdsourced network measurements, it is important to differentiate between active and passive measurements. Similar to the current working definition within the ITU-T Study Group 12 work item “E.CrowdESFB” (Crowdsourcing Approach for the assessment of end-to-end QoS in Fixed Broadband and Mobile Networks), the following definitions are made:

Active measurements create artificial traffic to generate crowd data.

Passive measurements do not create artificial traffic, but measure crowd data that is generated by the participant.

For example, a typical case of an active measurement is a speed test that generates artificial traffic against a test server in order to estimate bandwidth or QoS. A passive measurement instead may be realized by fetching cellular information from a mobile device, which has been collected without additional data generation.

2.3 Roles of the Actors

Participants have to commit to participation in the crowdsourcing measurements. The level of contribution can vary depending on the corresponding effort or level of engagement. The simplest action is to subscribe to or install a specific application, which collects data through measurements as part of its functioning – often in the background and not as part of the core functionality provided to the user. A more complex task-driven engagement requires a more important cognitive effort, such as providing subjective feedback on the performance or quality of certain Internet services. Hence, one must differentiate between participant-initiated measurements and automated measurements:

Participant-initiated measurements require the participant to initiate the measurement. The measurement data are typically provided to the participant.

Automated measurements can be performed without the need for the participant to initiate them. They are typically performed in the background.

A participant can thus be a user or a worker. The distinction depends on the main focus of the person doing the contribution and his/her engagement:

A crowdsourcing user is providing crowd data as the side effect of another activity, in the context of passive, automated measurements.

A crowdsourcing worker is providing crowd data as a consequence of his/her engagement when performing specific tasks, in the context of active, participant-initiated measurements.

The term “users” should, therefore, be used when the crowdsourced activity is not the main focus of engagement, but comes as a side effect of another activity – for example, when using a web browsing application which collects measurements in the background, which is a passive, automated measurement.

“Workers” are involved when the crowdsourced activity is the main driver of engagement, for example, when the worker is paid to perform specific tasks and is performing an active, participant-initiated measurement. Note that in some cases, workers can also be incentivized to provide passive measurement data (e.g. with applications collecting data in the background if not actively used).

In general, workers are paid on the basis of clear guidelines for their specific crowdsourcing activity, whereas users provide their contribution on the basis of a more ambiguous, indirect engagement, such as via the utilization of a particular service provided by the beneficiary of the crowdsourcing results, or a third-party crowd provider. Regardless of the participants’ level of engagement, the data resulting from the crowdsourcing measurement action is reported back to the initiator.

The initiator of the crowdsourcing measurement action often has to design a crowdsourcing measurement campaign, recruit the participants (selectively or openly), provide them with the necessary means (e.g. infrastructure and/or software) to run their action, provide the required (backend) infrastructure and software tools to the participants to run the action, collect, process and analyse the information, and possibly publish the results.

2.4 Dimensions of Crowdsourced Network Measurements

In light of the previous section, there are multiple dimensions to consider for crowdsourcing in the context of network measurements. A preliminary list of dimensions includes:

  • Level of subjectivity (subjective vs. objective measurements) in the crowd data
  • Level of engagement of the participant (participant-initiated or background) or their cognitive effort, and awareness (consciousness) of the measurement level of traffic generation (active vs. passive)
  • Type and level of incentives (attractiveness/appeal, paid or unpaid)

Besides these key dimensions, there are other features which are relevant in characterizing a crowdsourced network measurement activity. These include scale, cost, and value; the type of data collected; the goal or the intention, i.e. the intention of the user (based on incentives) versus the intention of the crowdsourcing initiator of the resulting output.

Figure 1: Dimensions for network measurements crowdsourcing definition, and relevant characterization features (examples with two types of measurement actions)

In Figure 1, we have illustrated some dimensions of network measurements based on crowdsourcing. Only the subjectivity, engagement and incentives dimension are displayed, on an arbitrary scale. The objective of this figure is to show that an initiator has a wide range of combinations for crowdsourcing action. The success of a measurement action with regard to an objective (number of participants, relevance of the results, etc.) is multifactorial. As an example, action 1 may indicate QoE measurements from a limited number of participants and action 2 visualizes the dimensions for network measurements by involving a large number of participants.

3 Summary

The attendees of the Würzburg seminar on “Crowdsourced Network and QoE Measurements” have produced a white paper, which defines terms in the context of crowdsourcing for network and QoE measurements, lists of relevant use cases from the perspective of different stakeholders, and discusses the challenges associated with designing crowdsourcing campaigns, analyzing, and interpreting the data. The goal of the white paper is to provide definitions to be commonly accepted by the community and to summarize the most important use-cases and challenges from industrial and academic perspectives.

References

[1] White Paper on Crowdsourced Network and QoE Measurements – Definitions, Use Cases and Challenges (2020). Tobias Hoßfeld and Stefan Wunderer, eds., Würzburg, Germany, March 2020. doi: 10.25972/OPUS-20232.

[2] Howe, J. (2006). The rise of crowdsourcing. Wired magazine, 14(6), 1-4.

[3] Estellés-Arolas, E., & González-Ladrón-De-Guevara, F. (2012). Towards an integrated crowdsourcing definition. Journal of Information science, 38(2), 189-200.

[4] Kietzmann, J. H. (2017). Crowdsourcing: A revised definition and introduction to new research. Business Horizons, 60(2), 151-153.

[5] ITU-T P.912, “Subjective video quality assessment methods for recognition tasks “, 08/2016

[6] ITU-T P.808 (ex P.CROWD), “Subjective evaluation of speech quality with a crowdsourcing approach”, 06/2018

An interview with Associate Professor Duc-Tien Dang-Nguyen

Tien at the beginning of his research career.

Describe your journey into research from your youth up to the present. What foundational lessons did you learn from this journey? Why were you initially attracted to multimedia?

Looking back at the early days of my life, my love for science started quite young. I loved solving puzzles and small recreational mathematical problems. Actually, I still do this. It may also be because my mother “seeded” many stories with great scientific people like Thomas Edison or Marie Curie every night. I admired them a lot and often dreamed of being like them. I also love to play video games. I played them a lot, and I think that I am quite good, especially in games like The Legend of Zelda and the Castlevania series. I also love to travel, and perhaps that is why I have a nomad’s journey over the last ten years, starting from Vietnam to Japan, Italy, Ireland, and now Norway. While living in Vietnam, I would often travel to the countryside on my motorbike. Solving puzzles, playing video games, collecting things, and travelling; these tiny things play an essential role in making me who I am today.

Now back to the story. I come from Vietnam, where it is very normal for my generation to grow through endless competitions. My first challenge was a math competition when I was eight. I then became a math student and followed many competitions like the current MIT Mystery Hunt. When I was 12, a friend of my father gave me his old PC as a present. It was a 486 (we called it that since it has an Intel 486 core), and it changed my life. I played with it endlessly. I learned Pascal by myself, and in the last year of my secondary schools (K-9), I proudly won the first rank at both Math and Informatics in the regional contests. Thanks to that, I entered one of the best high schools in Vietnam. I joined the Informatics class, and as you might already guess, we were dealing with programming challenges every day. We learned mainly algorithms and data structures, discrete mathematics, and computational complexity through solving challenging problems from the International Olympiad of Informatics. It is quite similar to Topcoder now. It was tough and very competitive, but it was exciting to me since it was like solving hard puzzles.

Moving to my bachelor’s, I took an honor program in Computer Science, which was one of the best Computer Science programs in Vietnam. In the third year of my bachelor’s in an Image Processing course, I did a project about image annotation. It was a pure K-means for image segmentation based on pixel color values, followed by a k-NN on a pre-trained set of images. It sounds pretty basic now, but this was in 2001, and “I did it my way” so it was a fantastic achievement! It was from this project I became a multimedia researcher.

After my bachelor’s, I continued researching computer vision and image retrieval in my master’s. In my first year as a Ph.D. student, I was working on a multimedia retrieval project, but just three months before the qualifying exam (you need to present your research proposal to continue your Ph.D.), I changed my research topic to Image Forensics, thanks to the course of the same name. I found everything I love in this new research field. It is like solving a puzzle, collecting evidence, and playing a game simultaneously. So, I became an image forensics researcher.

Some people say, “Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life”, perhaps they are missing the last part “because no one will hire you”. Yes, it’s just a joke, but it can also be quite true in may circumstances. It was hard to find a job that needs image forensics when I finished my Ph.D. However, since I know image processing, computer vision, and machine learning, it was not that hard for me to find a postdoc in those fields. I was then doing both multimedia forensics and multimedia retrieval. This “evolvement” introduced me to a new field, lifelogging, a research direction that tries to discover insights from personal data archives. At first, it was an “okay” field to me, but later, after digging more into it, I found many interesting challenges that need to be solved. And that was a very long story about how I reach the starting point of my research.

Can you profile your current research, its challenges, opportunities, and implications? Tell us more about your vision and objectives behind your current roles.

Bergen, where I mainly focus on image forensics and lifelogging. Multimedia forensics is about discovering the history of modifications to multimedia content such as videos, images, audio, etc. Mainly, I work with images and have dabbled a bit in video forensics. Audio is nice too, but I mostly enjoy working with the visual side of multimedia. People tend to think about multimedia forensics as a tool to check if an image or a video is real or fake. However, we also try to look at the specifics for the media in question. Some potential questions for an image could, for example, be where was it first posted? What type of camera was it taken with? These are questions that help identify the reliability of the image in questions and give more information than fake or real. Also, I believe that we should also take a further step by considering the context of use (how, where, and when) of the multimedia content. The expectation of truthfulness is radically different if the image is hanging in an art gallery than if it is being used as evidence in a court case.

As previously mentioned, I also work with lifelogging. This work is still in its early stages. We have not proposed any novel approaches yet. Instead, we are building a community by organizing research activities as workshops and bench-marking initiatives. We believe that by holding such events, we are preparing a solid user-base for the next phase when people are more familiar with such technologies, the phase of personal data analytics. We have witnessed great applications of AI during the last decade. Since AI needs data, and people need more personalized solutions, I believe that very soon we will be doing lifelogging in our everyday life. Let’s wait and see if my prediction is becoming true or not.

How would you describe your top innovative achievements in terms of the problems you were trying to solve, your solutions, and the impact it has today and into the future?

In multimedia forensics, I am quite happy that I was among the first to propose an approach for discriminating between computer graphics and natural human faces. People are well aware of “Deepfake”, and many great people are working on this problem. However, when I presented my first study in 2011, many people, including computer graphics researchers, were laughing when I told them that they would soon not be able to distinguish computer-generated faces from the real ones. In image forensics, we try to reveal all traces of the image acquisition history, and since digital images are based on pixels, they are susceptible to changes. For example, many traces of modifications become incredibly hard to find if the image is resized. Most of my approaches are thus physical or geometrical based, which makes them more robust against changes as well as more reliable in terms of decision explanation.

Over your distinguished career, what are your top lessons you want to share with the audience?

I believe that I am still at the start of my career, and perhaps the first and the most important lesson I have is about “causes and effects” or what Steve Jobs described as “Connecting the dots”. There are dots in our life that are very hard to understand or predict how everything is connected, but eventually, when looking back, the connections will reveal themselves over time. Just follow whatever you think is good for you and try very hard to make it a good “dot”. Everyone wants to work with something we love, but finding what we love in our current work is even more important.

What is the best joke you know?

Most of the jokes I love are in Vietnamese, and unless you are Vietnamese, you can’t get them. I am trying to think about some “Western” jokes that share some commonalities with Vietnamese humor and culture. That should be a politics joke. I believe that you can find a similar version with KGB or Stasi. This one was very famous, and surprisingly, it is very well suited to my current research on lifelogging 🙂

“Why do Stasi officers make such good taxi drivers? — You get in the car and they already know your name and where you live.”

A recent photo of Tien.

Bio: Duc-Tien Dang-Nguyen is an associate professor at the University of Bergen. His main research interests are multimedia forensics, lifelogging, and machine learning.

Dataset Column: ToCaDa Dataset with Multi-Viewpoint Synchronized Videos

This column describes the release of the Toulouse Campus Surveillance Dataset (ToCaDa). It consists of 25 synchronized videos (with audio) of two scenes recorded from different viewpoints of the campus. An extensive manual annotation comprises all moving objects and their corresponding bounding boxes, as well as audio events. The annotation was performed in order to i) enhance audiovisual objects that can be visible, audible or both, according to each recording location, and ii) uniquely identify all objects in each of the two scenes. All videos have been «anonymized». The dataset is available for download here.

Introduction

The increasing number of recording devices, such as smartphones, has led to an exponential production of audiovisual documents. These documents may correspond to the same scene, for instance an outdoor event filmed from different points of view. Such multi-view scenes contain a lot of information and provide new opportunities for answering high-level automatic queries.

In essence, these documents are multimodal, and their audio and video streams contain different levels of information. For example, the source of a sound may either be visible or not according to the different points of view. This information can be used separately or jointly to achieve different tasks, such as synchronising documents or following the displacement of a person. The analysis of these multi-view field recordings further allows understanding of complex scenarios. The automation of these tasks faces a need for data, as well as a need for the formalisation of multi-source retrieval and multimodal queries. As also stated by Lefter et al., “problems with automatically processing multimodal data start already from the annotation level” [1]. The complexity of the interactions between modalities forced the authors to produce three different types of annotations: audio, video, and multimodal.

In surveillance applications, humans and vehicles are the most important common elements studied. In consequence, detecting and matching a person or a car that appears in several videos is a key problem. Although many algorithms have been introduced, a major relative problem still is how to precisely evaluate and to compare these algorithms in reference to a common ground truth. Datasets are required for evaluating multi-view based methods.

During the last decade, public datasets have become more and more available, helping with the evaluation and comparison of algorithms, and in doing so, contributing to improvements in human and vehicle detection and tracking. However, most of the datasets focus on a specific task and do not support the evaluation of approaches that mix multiple sources of information. Only few datasets provide synchronized videos with overlapping fields of view. Yet, these rarely provide more than 4 different views even though more and more approaches could benefit from having additional views available. Moreover, soundtracks are almost never provided despite being a rich source of information, as voices and motor noises can help to recognize, respectively, a person or a car.

Notable multi-view datasets are the following.

  • The 3D People Surveillance Dataset (3DPeS) [2] comprises 8 cameras with disjoint views and 200 different people. Each person appears, on average, in 2 views. More than 600 video sequences are available. Thus, it is well-suited for people re-identification. Cameras parameters are provided, as well as a coarse 3D reconstruction of the surveilled environment.
  • The Video Image Retrieval and Analysis Tool (VIRAT) [3] dataset provides a large amount of surveillance videos with a high pixel resolution. In this dataset, 16 scenes were recorded for hours although in the end only 25 hours with significant activities were kept. Moreover, only two pairs of videos present overlapping fields of view. Moving objects were annotated by workers with bounding boxes, as well as some buildings or areas. Three types of events were also annotated, namely (i) single person events, (ii) person and vehicle events, and (iii) person and facility events, leading to 23 classes of events. Most actions were performed by people with minimal scripted actions, resulting in realistic scenarios with frequent incidental movers and occlusions.
  • Purely action-oriented datasets can be found in the Multicamera Human Action Video (MuHAVi) [4] dataset, in which 14 actors perform 17 different action classes (such as “kick”, “punch”, “gunshot collapse”) while 8 cameras capture the indoor scene. Likewise, Human3.6M [5] contains videos where 11 actors perform 15 different classes of actions while being filmed by 4 digital cameras; its specificity lies in the fact that 1 time-of-flight sensor and 10 motion cameras were also used to estimate and to provide the 3DT pose of the actors on each frame. Both background subtraction and bounding boxes are provided at each frame. In total, more than 3.6M frames are available. In these two datasets, actions are performed in unrealistic conditions as the actors follow a script consisting of actions that are performed one after the other.

In the table below a comparison is shown between the aforementioned datasets, which are contrasted with the new ToCaDa dataset we recently introduced and describe in more detail below.

Properties 3DPeS [2] VIRAT [3] MuHAVi [4] Human3.6M [5] ToCaDa [6]
# Cameras 8 static 16 static 8 static 4 static 25 static
# Microphones 0 0 0 0 25+2
Overlapping FOV Very partially 2+2 8 4 17
Disjoint FOV 8 12 0 0 4
Synchronized No No Partially Yes Yes
Pixel resolution 704 x 576 1920 x 1080 720 x 576 1000 x 1000 Mostly 1920 x 1080
# Visual objects 200 Hundreds 14 11 30
# Action types 0 23 17 15 0
# Bounding boxes 0 ≈ 1 object/second 0 ≈ 1 object/frame ≈ 1 object/second
In/outdoor Outdoor Outdoor Indoor Indoor Outdoor
With scenario No No Yes Yes Yes
Realistic Yes Yes No No Yes

ToCaDa Dataset

As a large multi-view, multimodal, and realistic video collection does not yet exist, we therefore took the initiative to produce such a dataset. The ToCaDa dataset [6] comprises 25 synchronized videos (including soundtrack) of the same scene recorded from multiple viewpoints. The dataset follows two detailed scenarios consisting of comings and goings of people, cars and motorbikes, with both overlapping and non-overlapping fields of view (see Figures 1-2). This dataset aims at paving the way for multidisciplinary approaches and applications such as 4D-scene reconstruction, object re-identification/tracking and multi-source metadata modeling and querying.

Figure 1: The campus contains 25 cameras, of which 8 are spread out across the area and 17 are located within the red rectangle (see Figure 2).
Figure 2: The main building where 17 cameras with overlapping fields of view are concentrated.

About 20 actors were asked to follow two realistic scenarios by performing scripted actions, like driving a car, walking, entering or leaving a building, or holding an item in hand while being filmed. In addition to ordinary actions, some suspicious behaviors are present. More precisely:

  • In the first scenario, a suspect car (C) with two men inside (D the driver and P the passenger) arrives and parks in front of the main building (within the sights of the cameras with overlapping views). P gets out of the car C and enters the building. Two minutes later, P leaves the building holding a package and gets in C. C leaves the parking (see Figure 3) and gets away from the university campus (passing in front of some of the disjoint fields of view cameras). Other vehicles and persons regularly move in different cameras with no suspicious behavior.
  • In the second scenario, a suspect car (C) with two men inside (D the driver and P the passenger) arrives and parks badly along the road. P gets out of the car and enters the building. Meanwhile, a women W knocks on the car window to ask the driver D to park correctly, but he drives off immediately. A few minutes later, P leaves the building with a package and seems confused as the car is missing. He then runs away. In the end, in one of the disjoint-view cameras, we can see him waiting until C picks him up.
Figure 3: A subset of all the synchronized videos for a particular frame of the first scenario. First row: cameras located in front of the building. Second and third rows: cameras that face the car park. A car is circled in red to highlight the largely overlapping fields of view.

The 25 camera holders we enlisted used their own mobile devices to record the scene, leading to a large variety of resolutions, image quality, frame rates and video duration. Three foghorns were blown in order to coordinate this heterogeneous disposal:

  • The first one stands for a warning 20 seconds before the start, to give enough time to start shooting.
  • The second one is the actual starting time, used to temporally synchronize the videos.
  • The third one indicates the ending time.

All the videos were collected and were manually synchronized using the second and the third foghorn blows as starting and ending times. Indeed, the second one can be heard at the beginning of every video.

Annotations

A special annotation procedure was set to handle the audiovisual content of this multi-view data [7]. Audio and video parts of each document were first separately annotated, after which a fusion of these modalities was realized.

The ground truth annotations are stored in json files. Each file corresponds to a video and shares the same title but not the same extension, namely <video_name>.mp4 annotations are stored in <video_name>.json. Both visual and audio annotations are stored together in the same file.

By annotating, our goal is to detect the visual objects and the salient sound events and, when possible, to associate them. Thus, we have grouped them into the generic term audio-visual object. This way, the appearance of a vehicle and its motor sound will constitute a single coherent audio-visual object and is associated with the same ID. An object that can be seen but cannot be heard is also an audio-visual object but with only a visual component, and similarly for an object that can only be heard. An example is given in Listing 1.

Listing 1: Json file structure of the visual component of an object in a video, visible from 13.8s to 18.2s and from 29.72s to 32.28s and associated with id 11.

To help with the annotation process, we developed a program for navigating through the frames of the synchronized videos and for identifying audio-visual objects by drawing bounding boxes in particular frames and/or specifying starting and ending times of salient sound. Bounding boxes were drawn around every moving object with a flag indicating whether the object was fully visible or occluded, specifying its category (human or vehicle), providing visual details (for example clothes types or colors), and timestamps of its apparitions and disappearances. Audio events were also annotated by a category and two timestamps.

Regarding bounding boxes, the coordinates of top-left and bottom-right corners of the bounding boxes are given. Bounding boxes were drawn such that the object is fully contained within the box and as tight as possible. For this purpose, our annotation tool allows the user to draw an initial approximate bounding box and then to adjust its boundaries at a pixel-level.

As drawing one bounding box for each object on every frame requires a huge amount of time, we have drawn bounding boxes on a subset of frames, so that the intermediate bounding boxes of an object can be linearly interpolated using its previous and next drawn bounding boxes. On average, we have drawn one bounding box per second for humans and two for vehicles due to their speed variation. For objects with irregular speed or trajectory, we have drawn more bounding boxes.

Regarding the audio component of an audio-visual object, namely the salient sound events, an audio category (voice, motor sound) is given in addition to its ID, as well as a list of details and time bounds (see Listing 2).

Listing 2: Json file structure of an audio event in a given video. As it is associated with id 11, it corresponds to the same audio-visual object as the one in Listing 1.

Finally, we linked the audio to the video objects, by giving the same ID to the audio object in case of causal identification, which means that the acoustic source of the audio event is the object (a car or a person for instance) that was annotated. This step was particularly crucial, and could not be automatized, as a complex expertise is required to identify the sound sources. For example, in the video sequence illustrated in Figure 4, a motor sound is audible and seems to come from the car whereas it actually comes from a motorbike behind the camera.

Figure 4: At this time of the video sequence of camera 10, a motor sound is heard and seems to come from the car while it actually comes from a motorbike behind the camera.

In case of an object presenting different sound categories (a car with door slams, music and motor sound for example), one object is created for each category and the same ID is given.

Ethical and Legal

According to the European legislation, it is forbidden to make images publicly available of people who might be recognized or of license plates. As people and license plates are visible in our videos, to conform to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) we decided to:

  • Ask actors to sign an authorization for publishing their image, and
  • Apply post treatment on videos to blur faces of other people and any license plates.

Conclusion

We have introduced a new dataset composed of two sets of 25 synchronized videos of the same scene with 17 overlapping views and 8 disjoint views. Videos are provided with their associated soundtracks. We have annotated the videos by manually drawing bounding boxes on moving objects. We have also manually annotated audio events. Our dataset offers simultaneously a large number of both overlapping and disjoint synchronized views and a realistic environment. It also provides audio tracks with sound events, high pixel resolution and ground truth annotations.

The originality and the richness of this dataset come from the wide diversity of topics it covers and the presence of scripted and non-scripted actions and events. Therefore, our dataset is well suited for numerous pattern recognition applications related to, but not restricted to, the domain of surveillance. We describe below, some multidisciplinary applications that could be evaluated using this dataset:

3D and 4D reconstruction: The multiple cameras sharing overlapping fields of view along with some provided photographs of the scene allow performing a 3D reconstruction of the static parts of the scene and to retrieve intrinsic parameters and poses of the cameras using a Structure-from-Motion algorithm. Beyond a 3D reconstruction, the temporal synchronization of the videos could enable to render dynamic parts of the scene as well and to obtain a 4D reconstruction.

Object recognition and consistent labeling: Evaluation of algorithms for human and vehicle detection and consistent labeling across multiple views can be performed using the annotated bounding boxes and IDs. To this end, overlapping views provide a 3D environment that could help to infer the label of an object in a video knowing its position and label in another video.

Sound event recognition: The audio events recorded from different locations and manually annotated provide opportunities to evaluate the relevance of consistent acoustic models by, for example, launching the identification and indexing of a specific sound event. Looking for a particular sound by similarity is also feasible.

Metadata modeling and querying: The multiple layers of information of this dataset, both low-level (audio/video signal) and high-level (semantic data available in the ground truth files) enable handling of information at different resolutions of space and time, allowing to perform queries on heterogeneous information.

References

[1] I. Lefter, L.J.M. Rothkrantz, G. Burghouts, Z. Yang, P. Wiggers. “Addressing multimodality in overt aggression detection”, in Proceedings of the International Conference on Text, Speech and Dialogue, 2011, pp. 25-32.
[2] D. Baltieri, R. Vezzani, R. Cucchiara. “3DPeS: 3D people dataset for surveillance and forensics”, in Proceedings of the 2011 joint ACM workshop on Human Gesture and Behavior Understanding, 2011, pp. 59-64.
[3] S. Oh, A. Hoogs, A. Perera, N. Cuntoor, C. Chen, J.T. Lee, S. Mukherjee, J.K. Aggarwal, H. Lee, L. Davis, E. Swears, X. Wang, Q. Ji, K. Reddy, M. Shah, C. Vondrick, H. Pirsiavash, D. Ramanan, J. Yuen, A. Torralba, B. Song, A. Fong, A. Roy-Chowdhury, M. Desai. “A large-scale benchmark dataset for event recognition in surveillance video”, in Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, 2011, pp. 3153-3160.
[4] S. Singh, S.A. Velastin, H. Ragheb. “MuHAVi: A multicamera human action video dataset for the evaluation of action recognition methods”, in Proceedings of the 7th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Video and Signal Based Surveillance, 2010, pp. 48-55.
[5] C. Ionescu, D. Papava, V. Olaru, C. Sminchisescu. “Human3.6M: Large scale datasets and predictive methods for 3d human sensing in natural environments”, IEEE transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 36(7), 2013, pp. 1325-1339.
[6] T. Malon, G. Roman-Jimenez, P. Guyot, S. Chambon, V. Charvillat, A. Crouzil, A. Péninou, J. Pinquier, F. Sèdes, C. Sénac. “Toulouse campus surveillance dataset: scenarios, soundtracks, synchronized videos with overlapping and disjoint views”, in Proceedings of the 9th ACM Multimedia Systems Conference. 2018, pp. 393-398.
[7] P. Guyot, T. Malon, G. Roman-Jimenez, S. Chambon, V. Charvillat, A. Crouzil, A. Péninou, J. Pinquier, F. Sèdes, C. Sénac. “Audiovisual annotation procedure for multi-view field recordings”, in Proceedings of the International Conference on Multimedia Modeling, 2019, pp. 399-410.

MPEG Column: 129th MPEG Meeting in Brussels, Belgium

The original blog post can be found at the Bitmovin Techblog and has been modified/updated here to focus on and highlight research aspects.

The 129th MPEG meeting concluded on January 17, 2020 in Brussels, Belgium with the following topics:

  • Coded representation of immersive media – WG11 promotes Network-Based Media Processing (NBMP) to the final stage
  • Coded representation of immersive media – Publication of the Technical Report on Architectures for Immersive Media
  • Genomic information representation – WG11 receives answers to the joint call for proposals on genomic annotations in conjunction with ISO TC 276/WG 5
  • Open font format – WG11 promotes Amendment of Open Font Format to the final stage
  • High efficiency coding and media delivery in heterogeneous environments – WG11 progresses Baseline Profile for MPEG-H 3D Audio
  • Multimedia content description interface – Conformance and Reference Software for Compact Descriptors for Video Analysis promoted to the final stage

Additional Important Activities at the 129th WG 11 (MPEG) meeting

The 129th WG 11 (MPEG) meeting was attended by more than 500 experts from 25 countries working on important activities including (i) a scene description for MPEG media, (ii) the integration of Video-based Point Cloud Compression (V-PCC) and Immersive Video (MIV), (iii) Video Coding for Machines (VCM), and (iv) a draft call for proposals for MPEG-I Audio among others.

The corresponding press release of the 129th MPEG meeting can be found here: https://mpeg.chiariglione.org/meetings/129. This report focused on network-based media processing (NBMP), architectures of immersive media, compact descriptors for video analysis (CDVA), and an update about adaptive streaming formats (i.e., DASH and CMAF).

MPEG picture at Friday plenary; © Rob Koenen (Tiledmedia).

Coded representation of immersive media – WG11 promotes Network-Based Media Processing (NBMP) to the final stage

At its 129th meeting, MPEG promoted ISO/IEC 23090-8, Network-Based Media Processing (NBMP), to Final Draft International Standard (FDIS). The FDIS stage is the final vote before a document is officially adopted as an International Standard (IS). During the FDIS vote, publications and national bodies are only allowed to place a Yes/No vote and are no longer able to make any technical changes. However, project editors are able to fix typos and make other necessary editorial improvements.

What is NBMP? The NBMP standard defines a framework that allows content and service providers to describe, deploy, and control media processing for their content in the cloud by using libraries of pre-built 3rd party functions. The framework includes an abstraction layer to be deployed on top of existing commercial cloud platforms and is designed to be able to be integrated with 5G core and edge computing. The NBMP workflow manager is another essential part of the framework enabling the composition of multiple media processing tasks to process incoming media and metadata from a media source and to produce processed media streams and metadata that are ready for distribution to media sinks.

Why NBMP? With the increasing complexity and sophistication of media services and the incurred media processing, offloading complex media processing operations to the cloud/network is becoming critically important in order to keep receiver hardware simple and power consumption low.

Research aspects: NBMP reminds me a bit about what has been done in the past in MPEG-21, specifically Digital Item Adaptation (DIA) and Digital Item Processing (DIP). The main difference is that MPEG now targets APIs rather than pure metadata formats, which is a step forward in the right direction as APIs can be implemented and used right away. NBMP will be particularly interesting in the context of new networking approaches including, but not limited to, software-defined networking (SDN), information-centric networking (ICN), mobile edge computing (MEC), fog computing, and related aspects in the context of 5G.

Coded representation of immersive media – Publication of the Technical Report on Architectures for Immersive Media

At its 129th meeting, WG11 (MPEG) published an updated version of its technical report on architectures for immersive media. This technical report, which is the first part of the ISO/IEC 23090 (MPEG-I) suite of standards, introduces the different phases of MPEG-I standardization and gives an overview of the parts of the MPEG-I suite. It also documents use cases and defines architectural views on the compression and coded representation of elements of immersive experiences. Furthermore, it describes the coded representation of immersive media and the delivery of a full, individualized immersive media experience. MPEG-I enables scalable and efficient individual delivery as well as mass distribution while adjusting to the rendering capabilities of consumption devices. Finally, this technical report breaks down the elements that contribute to a fully immersive media experience and assigns quality requirements as well as quality and design objectives for those elements.

Research aspects: This technical report provides a kind of reference architecture for immersive media, which may help identify research areas and research questions to be addressed in this context.

Multimedia content description interface – Conformance and Reference Software for Compact Descriptors for Video Analysis promoted to the final stage

Managing and organizing the quickly increasing volume of video content is a challenge for many industry sectors, such as media and entertainment or surveillance. One example task is scalable instance search, i.e., finding content containing a specific object instance or location in a very large video database. This requires video descriptors that can be efficiently extracted, stored, and matched. Standardization enables extracting interoperable descriptors on different devices and using software from different providers so that only the compact descriptors instead of the much larger source videos can be exchanged for matching or querying. ISO/IEC 15938-15:2019 – the MPEG Compact Descriptors for Video Analysis (CDVA) standard – defines such descriptors. CDVA includes highly efficient descriptor components using features resulting from a Deep Neural Network (DNN) and uses predictive coding over video segments. The standard is being adopted by the industry. At its 129th meeting, WG11 (MPEG) has finalized the conformance guidelines and reference software. The software provides the functionality to extract, match, and index CDVA descriptors. For easy deployment, the reference software is also provided as Docker containers.

Research aspects: The availability of reference software helps to conduct reproducible research (i.e., reference software is typically publicly available for free) and the Docker container even further contributes to this aspect.

DASH and CMAF

The 4th edition of DASH has already been published and is available as ISO/IEC 23009-1:2019. Similar to previous iterations, MPEG’s goal was to make the newest edition of DASH publicly available for free, with the goal of industry-wide adoption and adaptation. During the most recent MPEG meeting, we worked towards implementing the first amendment which will include additional (i) CMAF support and (ii) event processing models with minor updates; these amendments are currently in draft and will be finalized at the 130th MPEG meeting in Alpbach, Austria. An overview of all DASH standards and updates are depicted in the figure below:

ISO/IEC 23009-8 or “session-based DASH operations” is the newest variation of MPEG-DASH. The goal of this part of DASH is to allow customization during certain times of a DASH session while maintaining the underlying media presentation description (MPD) for all other sessions. Thus, MPDs should be cacheable within content distribution networks (CDNs) while additional information should be customizable on a per session basis within a newly added session-based description (SBD). It is understood that the SBD should have an efficient representation to avoid file size issues and it should not duplicate information typically found in the MPD.

The 2nd edition of the CMAF standard (ISO/IEC 23000-19) will be available soon (currently under FDIS ballot) and MPEG is currently reviewing additional tools in the so-called ‘technologies under considerations’ document. Therefore, amendments were drafted for additional HEVC media profiles and exploration activities on the storage and archiving of CMAF contents.

The next meeting will bring MPEG back to Austria (for the 4th time) and will be hosted in Alpbach, Tyrol. For more information about the upcoming 130th MPEG meeting click here.

Click here for more information about MPEG meetings and their developments

JPEG Column: 86th JPEG Meeting in Sydney, Australia

The 86th JPEG meeting was held in Sydney, Australia.

Among the different activities that took place, the JPEG Committee issued a Call for Evidence on learning-based image coding solutions. This call results from the success of the  explorations studies recently carried out by the JPEG Committee, and honours the pioneering work of JPEG issuing the first image coding standard more than 25 years ago.

In addition, a First Call for Evidence on Point Cloud Coding was issued in the framework of JPEG Pleno. Furthermore, an updated version of the JPEG Pleno reference software and a JPEG XL open source implementation have been released, while JPEG XS continues the development of raw-Bayer image sensor compression.

JPEG Plenary at the 86th meeting.

The 86th JPEG meeting had the following highlights:

  • JPEG AI issues a call for evidence on machine learning based image coding solutions
  • JPEG Pleno issues call for evidence on Point Cloud coding
  • JPEG XL verification test reveal competitive performance with commonly used image coding solutions 
  • JPEG Systems submitted final texts for Privacy & Security
  • JPEG XS announces new coding tools optimised for compression of raw-Bayer image sensor data

JPEG AI

The JPEG Committee launched a learning-based image coding activity more than a year ago, also referred as JPEG AI. This activity aims to find evidence for image coding technologies that offer substantially better compression efficiency when compared to conventional approaches but relying on models exploiting a large image database.

A Call for Evidence (CfE) has been issued as outcome of the 86th JPEG meeting, Sydney, Australia as a first formal step to consider standardisation of such approaches in image compression. The CfE is organised in coordination with the IEEE MMSP 2020 Grand Challenge on Learning-based Image Coding Challenge and will use the same content, evaluation methodologies and deadlines.

JPEG Pleno

JPEG Pleno is working toward the integration of various modalities of plenoptic content under a single framework and in a seamless manner. Efficient and powerful point cloud representation is a key feature within this vision.  Point cloud data supports a wide range of applications including computer-aided manufacturing, entertainment, cultural heritage preservation, scientific research and advanced sensing and analysis. During the 86th JPEG Meeting, the JPEG Committee released a First Call for Evidence on JPEG Pleno Point Cloud Coding to be integrated in the JPEG Pleno framework.  This Call for Evidence focuses specifically on point cloud coding solutions that support scalability and random access of decoded point clouds.

Furthermore, a Reference Software implementation of the JPEG Pleno file format (Part 1) and light field coding technology (Part 2) is made publicly available as open source on the JPEG Gitlab repository (https://gitlab.com/wg1). The JPEG Pleno Reference Software is planned to become an International Standard as Part 4 of JPEG Pleno by the end of 2020.

JPEG XL

The JPEG XL Image Coding System (ISO/IEC 18181) has produced an open source reference implementation available on the JPEG Gitlab repository (https://gitlab.com/wg1/jpeg-xl). The software is available under Apache 2, which includes a royalty-free patent grant. Speed tests indicate the multithreaded encoder and decoder outperforms libjpeg-turbo. 

Independent subjective and objective evaluation experiments have indicated competitive performance with commonly used image coding solutions while offering new functionalities such as lossless transcoding from legacy JPEG format to JPEG XL. The standardisation process has reached the Draft International Standard stage.

JPEG exploration into Media Blockchain

Fake news, copyright violations, media forensics, privacy and security are emerging challenges in digital media. JPEG has determined that blockchain and distributed ledger technologies (DLT) have great potential as a technology component to address these challenges in transparent and trustable media transactions. However, blockchain and DLT need to be integrated efficiently with a widely adopted standard to ensure broad interoperability of protected images. Therefore, the JPEG committee has organised several workshops to engage with the industry and help to identify use cases and requirements that will drive the standardisation process.

During its Sydney meeting, the committee organised an Open Discussion Session on Media Blockchain and invited local stakeholders to take part in an interactive discussion. The discussion focused on media blockchain and related application areas including, media and document provenance, smart contracts, governance, legal understanding and privacy. The presentations of this session are available on the JPEG website. To keep informed and to get involved in this activity, interested parties are invited to register to the ad hoc group’s mailing list.

JPEG Systems

JPEG Systems & Integration submitted final texts for ISO/IEC 19566-4 (Privacy & Security), ISO/IEC 24800-2 (JPSearch), and ISO/IEC 15444-16 2nd edition (JPEG 2000-in-HEIF) for publication.  Amendments to add new capabilities for JUMBF and JPEG 360 reached Committee Draft stage and will be reviewed and balloted by national bodies.

The JPEG Privacy & Security release is timely as consumers are increasingly aware and concerned about the need to protect privacy in imaging applications.  The JPEG 2000-in-HEIF enables embedding JPEG 2000 images in the HEIF file format.  The updated JUMBF provides a more generic means to embed images and other media within JPEG files to enable richer image experiences.  The updated JPEG 360 adds stereoscopic 360 images, and a method to accelerate the rendering of a region-of-interest within an image in order to reduce the latency experienced by users.  JPEG Systems & Integrations JLINK, which elaborates the relationships of the embedded media within the file, created updated use cases to refine the requirements, and continued technical discussions on implementation.

JPEG XS

The JPEG committee is pleased to announce the specification of new coding tools optimised for compression of raw-Bayer image sensor data. The JPEG XS project aims at the standardisation of a visually lossless, low-latency and lightweight compression scheme that can be used as a mezzanine codec in various markets. Video transport over professional video links, real-time video storage in and outside of cameras, and data compression onboard of autonomous cars are among the targeted use cases for raw-Bayer image sensor compression. Amendment of the Core Coding System, together with new profiles targeting raw-Bayer image applications are ongoing and expected to be published by the end of 2020.

Final Quote

“The efforts to find new and improved solutions in image compression have led JPEG to explore new opportunities relying on machine learning for coding. After rigorous analysis in form of explorations during the last 12 months, JPEG believes that it is time to formally initiate a standardisation process, and consequently, has issued a call for evidence for image compression based on machine learning.” said Prof. Touradj Ebrahimi, the Convenor of the JPEG Committee.

86th JPEG meeting social event in Sydney, Australia.

About JPEG

The Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) is a Working Group of ISO/IEC, the International Organisation for Standardization / International Electrotechnical Commission, (ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 29/WG 1) and of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU-T SG16), responsible for the popular JPEG, JPEG 2000, JPEG XR, JPSearch, JPEG XT and more recently, the JPEG XS, JPEG Systems, JPEG Pleno and JPEG XL families of imaging standards.

More information about JPEG and its work is available at www.jpeg.org or by contacting Antonio Pinheiro or Frederik Temmermans (pr@jpeg.org) of the JPEG Communication Subgroup. If you would like to stay posted on JPEG activities, please subscribe to the jpeg-news mailing list on http://jpeg-news-list.jpeg.org.  

Future JPEG meetings are planned as follows:

  • No 87, Erlangen, Germany, April 25 to 30, 2020 (Cancelled because of Covid-19 outbreak; Replaced by online meetings.)
  • No 88, Geneva, Switzerland, July 4 to 10, 2020

Collaborative QoE Management using SDN

The Software-Defined Networking (SDN) paradigm offers the flexibility and programmability in the deployment and management of network services by separating the Control plane from the Data plane. Being based on network abstractions and virtualization techniques, SDN allows for simplifying the implementation of traffic engineering techniques as well as the communication among different services providers, included Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and Over The Top (OTT) providers. For these reasons, the SDN architectures have been widely used in the last years for the QoE-aware management of multimedia services.

The paper [1] presents Timber, an open source SDN-based emulation platform to provide the research community with a tool for experimenting new QoE management approaches and algorithms, which may also rely on information exchange between ISP and OTT [2].  We believe that the exchange of information between the OTT and the ISP is extremely important because:

  1. QoE models depend on different influence factors, i.e., network, application, system and context factors [3];
  2. OTT and ISP have different information in their hands, i.e., network state and application Key Quality Indicators (KQIs), respectively;
  3. End-to-end encryption of the OTT services makes it difficult for ISP to have access to application KQIs to perform QoE-aware network management.

In the following we briefly describe Timber and the impact of collaborative QoE management.

Timber architecture

Figure 1 represents the reference architecture, which is composed of four planes. The Service Management Plane is a cloud space owned by the OTT provider, which includes: a QoE Monitoring module to estimate the user’s QoE on the basis of service parameters acquired at the client side; a DB where QoE measurements are stored and can be shared with third parties; a Content Distribution service to deliver multimedia contents. Through the RESTful APIs, the OTTs give access to part of the information stored in the DB to the ISP, on the basis of appropriate agreements.

The Network Data Plane, Network Control Plane, and the Network Management Plane are the those in the hands of the ISP. The Network Data Plane includes all the SDN enabled data forwarding network devices; the Network Control Plane consists of the SDN controller which manages the network devices through Southbound APIs; and the Network Management Plane is the application layer of the SDN architecture controlled by the ISP to perform network-wide control operations which communicates with the OTT via RESTful APIs. The SDN application includes a QoS Monitoring module to monitor the performance of the network, a Management Policy module to take into account Service Level Agreements (SLA), and a Control Actions module that decides on the network control actions to be implemented by the SDN controller to optimize the network resources and improve the service’s quality.

Timber implements this architecture on top of the Mininet SDN emulator and the Ryu SDN controller, which provides the major functionalities of the traffic engineering abstractions. According to the depicted scenario, the OTT has the potential to monitor the level of QoE for the provided services as it has access to the needed application and network level KQIs (Key Quality Indicators). On the other hand, the ISP has the potential to control the network level quality by changing the allocated resources. This scenario is implemented in Timber and allows for setting the needed emulation network and application configuration to text QoE-aware service management algorithms.

Specifically, the OTT performs QoE monitoring of the delivered service by acquiring service information from the client side based on passive measurements of service-related KQIs obtained through probes installed in the user’s devices. Based on these measurements, specific QoE models can be used to predict the user experience. The QoE measurements of active clients’ sessions are also stored in the OTT DB, which can also be accessed by the ISP through mentioned RESTful APIs. The ISP’s SDN application periodically controls the OTT-reported QoE and, in case of observed QoE degradations, implements network-wide policies by communicating with the SDN controller through the Northbound APIs. Accordingly, the SDN controller performs network management operations such as link-aggregation, addition of new flows, network slicing, by controlling the network devices through Southbound APIs.

QoE management based on information exchange: video service use-case

The previously described scenario, which is implemented by Timber, portraits a collaborative scenario between the ISP and the OTT, where the first provides QoE-related data and the later takes care of controlling the resources allocated to the deployed services. Ahmad et al. [4] makes use of Timber to conduct experiments aimed at investigating the impact of the frequency of information exchange between an OTT providing a video streaming service and the ISP on the end-user QoE.

Figure 2 shows the experiments topology. Mininet in Timber is used to create the network topology, which in this case regards the streaming of video sequences from the media server to the User1 (U1) when web traffic is also transmitted on the same network towards User2 (U2). U1 and U2 are two virtual hosts sharing the same access network and act as the clients. U1 runs the client-side video player and the Apache server provides both web and HAS (HTTP Adaptive Streaming) video services.

In the considered collaboration scenario, QoE-related KQIs are extracted from the client-side and sent to the to the MongoDB database (managed by the OTT), as depicted by the red dashed arrows. This information is then retrieved by the SDN controller of the ISP at frequency f (see green dashed arrow). The aim is to provide different network level resources to video streaming and normal web traffic when QoE degradation is observed for the video service. These control actions on the network are needed because TCP-based web traffic sessions of 4 Mbps start randomly towards U2 during the HD video streaming sessions, causing network time varying bottlenecks in the S1−S2 link. In these cases, the SDN controller implements virtual network slicing at S1 and S2 OVS switches, which provides the minimum guaranteed throughput of 2.5 Mbps and 1 Mbps to video streaming and web traffic, respectively. The SDN controller application utilizes flow matching criteria to assign flows to the virtual slice. The objective of this emulations is to show the impact of f on the resulting QoE.

The Big Buck Bunny 60-second long video sequence in 1280 × 720 was streamed between the server and the U1 by considering 5 different sampling intervals T for information exchange between OTT and ISP, i.e., 2s, 4s, 8s, 16s, and 32s. The information exchanged in this case were the average length stalling duration and the number of stalling events measured by the probe at the client video player. Accordingly, the QoE for the video streaming service was measured in terms of predicted MOS using the QoE model defined in [5] for HTTP video streaming, as follows:
MOSp = α exp( -β(L)N ) + γ
where L and N are the average length stalling duration and the number of stalling events, respectively, whereas α=3.5, γ=1.5, and β(L)=0.15L+0.19.

Figure 3.a shows the average predicted MOS when information is exchanged at different sampling intervals (the inverse of f). The greatest MOSp is 4.34 obtained for T=2s, and T=4s. Exponential decay in MOSp is observed as the frequency of information exchange decreases. The lowest MOSp is 3.07 obtained for T=32s. This result shows that greater frequency of information exchange leads to low latency in the controller response to QoE degradation. The reason is that the buffer at the client player side keeps on starving for longer durations in case of higher T resulting into longer stalling durations until the SDN controller gets triggered to provide the guaranteed network resources to support the video streaming service.

Figure 3.b Initial loading time, average stalling duration and latency in controller response to quality degradation for different sampling intervals.

Figure 3.b shows the video initial loading time, average stalling duration and latency in controller response to quality degradation w.r.t different sampling intervals. The latency in controller response to QoE degradation increases linearly as the frequency of information exchange decreases while the stalling duration grows exponentially as the frequency decrease. The initial loading time seems to be not relevantly affected by different sampling intervals.

Conclusions

Experiments are conducted on an SDN emulation environment to investigate the impact of the frequency of information exchange between OTT and ISP when a collaborative network management approach is considered. The QoE for a video streaming service is measured by considering 5 different sampling intervals for information exchange between OTT and ISP, i.e., 2s, 4s, 8s, 16s, and 32s. The information exchanged are the video average length stalling duration and the number of stalling events.

The experiment results showed that higher frequency of information exchange results in greater delivered QoE, but a sampling interval lower than 4s (frequency > ¼ Hz) may not further improve the delivered QoE. Clearly, this threshold depends on the variability of the network conditions. Further studies are needed to understand how frequently the ISP and OTT should collaboratively share data to have observable benefits in terms of QoE varying the network status and the deployed services.

References

[1] A. Ahmad, A. Floris and L. Atzori, “Timber: An SDN based emulation platform for QoE Management Experimental Research,” 2018 Tenth International Conference on Quality of Multimedia Experience (QoMEX), Cagliari, 2018, pp. 1-6.

[2] https://github.com/arslan-ahmad/Timber-DASH

[3] P. Le Callet, S. Möller, A. Perkis et al., “Qualinet White Paper on Definitions of Quality of Experience (2012),” in European Network on Quality of Experience in Multimedia Systems and Services (COST Action IC 1003), Lausanne, Switzerland, Version 1.2, March 2013.

[4] A. Ahmad, A. Floris and L. Atzori, “Towards Information-centric Collaborative QoE Management using SDN,” 2019 IEEE Wireless Communications and Networking Conference (WCNC), Marrakesh, Morocco, 2019, pp. 1-6.

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